ULTRAMARINE BLUE

PRODUCT IDENTIFICATION

 

CAS NO.

57455-37-5, 67053-79-6

 

EINECS NO.

309-928-3, 235-811-0, 215-111-1

FORMULA

Na2OSAl2O3SiO2

MOL WT.  
H.S. CODE  
TOXICITY  
SYNONYMS C.I. Pigment Blue 29; C.I. 77007; Ultramarine;
Ultramarine blue pigment; Azure blue; Azzurrum ultramarine; Azzurrum transmarinum; Azzuro oltramarino; azur d'Acre; pierre d'azur; Lazurstein; Other RN: 12769-95-8, 1317-97-1, 1332-79-2, 56091-53-3, 1302-83-6, 12769-96-9
SMILES
 

CLASSIFICATION

Inorganic pigment

EXTRA NOTES

Blue pigment occurring naturally as mineral lapis lazuli; believed to have formula Na7-A16-Si6-024-S2.
TSCA Definition 2008: This substance is identified in the COLOUR INDEX by Colour Index Constitution Number, C.I. 77007.

PHYSICAL AND CHEMICAL PROPERTIES

PHYSICAL STATE

dark blue powder

MELTING POINT

>1000 C (Decomposes)

BOILING POINT  
SPECIFIC GRAVITY 2.35
SOLUBILITY IN WATER

Insoluble

SOLUBILITY

 

AUTOIGNITION  
pH 6 - 9
VAPOR DENSITY  
NFPA RATINGS Health: 1; Flammability: 0; Reactivity: 0

REFRACTIVE INDEX

 
FLASH POINT

 

STABILITY Stable under ordinary conditions

GENERAL DESCRIPTION & EXTERNAL LINKS

Ultramarine is a blue pigment consisting of sodium aluminosilicate with three sulphur atoms in a form of sulfide or sulfate in which unpaired S3- anion originates the blue color. It is prepared by heating kaolin, sodium carbonate, sulfur and other inexpensive modifier ingredients. Synthetic ultramarine does not show vivid blue as much as natural ultramarine due to even particle size which diffuses light more evenly. Synthetic ultramarine color is affected by light, oil, or lime. Ultramarine features heat and alkali resistance. It is used as a colorant and optical whitening agent for plastics, rubber, inks, paints, cosmetics, detergents, cement, textile and paper.

Members of pigment blue

Pigment

C.I.No.

CAS RN

Cascade blue Pigment Blue 1 1325-87-7
Cascade blue phosphomolybdate Pigment Blue 1, phosphomolybdate 68083-42-1
  Pigment Blue 1, Silicomolybdate 68413-81-0
  Pigment Blue 1, tungstophosphate 68647-33-6
  Pigment Blue 9 1325-74-2
  Pigment Blue 9, tannate 68477-20-3
C.I. 44040:2 Pigment Blue 10 1325-93-5
  Pigment Blue 14 1325-88-8
Copper phthalocyanine Pigment Blue 15 147-14-8
Copper monochlorophthalocyanine Pigment Blue 15:1 12239-87-1
Phthalocyanine Pigment Blue 16 574-93-6

 

Pigment Blue 17  71799-4-7
  Pigment Blue 19 58569-23-6
Alizanthrene Blue Pigment Blue 22 1324-27-2
Dianisidine blue Pigment Blue 26 5437-88-7
Ammonium Prussian blue Pigment Blue 27 12240-15-2
Cobalt blue Pigment Blue 28 1345-16-0
Lazurite Pigment Blue 29 1302-83-6
Ultramarine Pigment Blue 29 57455-37-5
Cosmetic ultramarine blue Pigment Blue 29 12769-96-9
  Pigment Blue 3 1325-79-7
Cupric sulfide Pigment Blue 34 1317-40-4
Cobalt tin oxide Pigment Blue 35 1345-19-3
Aluminum chromium cobalt oxide Pigment Blue 36 68187-11-1
Indanthrene Blue Pigment Blue 60 81-77-6
Reflex Blue R Pigment Blue 61 1324-76-1
Indigo carmine-aluminum lake Pigment Blue 63 16521-38-3
3,3'-Dichloroindanthrene Pigment Blue 64 130-20-1
Violanthrone Pigment Blue 65 116-71-2
Indigo Pigment Blue 66 482-89-3
Zirconium vanadium blue zircon Pigment Blue 71 68186-95-8
Cobalt zinc aluminate blue spinel Pigment Blue 72 68186-87-8
Cobalt silicate blue olivine Pigment Blue 73 68187-40-6
Cobalt Zinc Silicate Blue Phenacite Pigment Blue 74 68412-74-8

Wikipedia Linking:http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ultramarine

http://www.webexhibits.org/
Brief description of Ultramarine:The finest blue known to the ancients, was obtained from the precious stone lapis lazuli (lazurite), a costly mineral. The mineral lazurite is a complex sodium calcium aluminum silicate sulfate. Lapis lazuli has been mined for centuries from a location still in use today in the mountain valley of Kokcha, Afghanistan. First mined 6,000 years ago, the rock was transported to Egypt and later to Europe where it was used in jewelry and paint pigment. Europeans called the expensive powdered pigment ultramarine, which literally means over the sea. Since the 19th century, ultramarine has been manufactured artificially

http://www.ut.ee
The natural variety is a very costly blue pigment with exceptional chemical stability except in the presence of acids. It is two types of ultramarine blue:  natural ultramarine and synthetic ultramarine. Natural Ultramarine  is famous for having been the most expensive pigment. It was more expensive than gold during the Renaissance. First used in 6th century Afghanistan, the pigment found its most extensive use in 14th and 15th century illuminated manuscripts and Italian panel paintings, often reserved for the cloaks of Christ and the Virgin. Genuine blue pigment is from the semi-precious stone, lapis lazuli, which is a mixture of the blue mineral, lazurite, with calcspar and iron pyrites. Natural ultramarine is unaffected by red heat or by alkalis but is decomposed by dilute acids, even acetic acid, with complete loss of color and the discharge of hydrogen sulphide gas. The blue is stable, however, in strong light and many specimens which are several hundred years old show no apparent change in color. Synthetic ultramarine is one of the best-documented pigments of the nineteenth century probably because its invention was requested of chemists and not the result of their independent research. Ultramarine, genuine made from the semi-precious gem lapis lazuli was so costly in the nineteenth century that artists infrequently used it. The hue is a necessary component in a balanced palette of warm and cool colors; without it a cool, deep blue is lacking. In chemical composition and structure it is identical with the natural ultramarine. This blue is stable under all conditions, except in the present of acids. It is permanent to light and is unaffected by high temperatures. Since it is unaffected by alkalis, it is stable in fresco. Synthetic ultramarine is today quite widely used as an artist´s pigment and is known to many as "French ultramarine" because of its discovery (1830) and long production in France.

http://cabinetmagazine.org/
EARLY 13TH CENTURY: Ultramarine, which contains more impurities than blue particles, is still the most difficult artist's pigment to grind by hand. Some improvements in its production make manufacturing more efficient—meaning more reliable supplies for artists who are using the color to portray queens, kings, and religious figures. But this also increases demand for lapis lazuli gems. As its price surpasses that of gold, ultramarine blue literally becomes the material wealth it had heretofore signified. Patrons commonly specify in writing the exact amount of ultramarine blue they will purchase for the artist to use in commissioned paintings.

SALES SPECIFICATION

APPEARANCE

dark blue powder

 

 

 

 

TRANSPORTATION
PACKING 25kgs in bag
HAZARD CLASS not regulated
UN NO.

 

OTHER INFORMATION

Hazard Symbols: n/a Risk Phrases: n/a, Safety Phrases: 14-29